Posts Tagged Yosemite

Vintage Views: California

Bay-Bridge-1934-Standard-Oil-Bulletin_FINALSometimes majesty is found in the architecture of an environment, like the bridges that span the San Francisco Bay. Perhaps the most emblematic of those bridges are the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge. Both of these architectural feats were constructed in the 1930’s and, although the eastern span of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge has since been replaced after sections were damaged during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, the Golden Gate still stands intact today. The Golden Gate Bridge, between the City of San Francisco and Marin County, was begun on January 5, 1933 and opened on May 27, 1937. The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge), between the City of San Francisco and Oakland and anchored in the middle by Yerba Buena Island, was begun in 1933 and opened on November 12, 1936. Before the bridges were built, residents crossed the bay via an Air Ferry (of Air Ferries, Ltd.), amphibious air crafts that bridged the San Francisco Bay between terminals in San Francisco and Oakland. Coming in under 7 minutes from shore to shore, such flights were considered to be the most frequent and shortest air service in the world. The air ferries would eventually become obsolete with the construction of the Bay Bridge in 1936.

To celebrate these sister bridges, I have added several additional vintage images of California accumulated in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). One by one, I have been carefully digitizing these assorted California ephemera to immortalize them on a more permanent medium.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, and Yerba Buena Island cover art, as well as other vintage views of California, as 12X18 inch wall art mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

 

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Vintage Views: California

With the majestic Half Dome of Yosemite fame framed by the solid granite bedrock of the Wawona Tunnel – at that time (ca. 1932) still under construction – I am excited to share the newest iconic vintage images of California accumulated in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). One by one, I have been carefully digitizing these assorted California ephemera to immortalize them on a more permanent medium.

Inside this particular bulletin, dated 1932, the editor notes:

As you emerge from a hole in perpendicular granite cliffs, you are greeted by daylight, last in evidence nearly a mile behind you, and with it the whole Yosemite Valley appears to rush upon you. You catch your breath, awed and delighted – perhaps just a bit frightened – by its magnificence and the abruptness with which it has come. The glorious panorama now seems suddenly to have  become stationary, and you start traveling – as yet only by air routes and vision – to one after another of those stupendous creations of Nature that make this great gorge outstanding among the scenic wonders of the world.

This ‘hole,” as they called it, is the eastern portal of the Wawona Tunnel, which today conveys the Wawona Road 4,233 feet (1,290 m) through a mountain at the terminus of State Route 41 before discharging Yosemite National Park visitors at the Tunnel View scenic outlook. As they erupt into sunlight, there before them stands El Capitan (left), Half Dome (center), and Bridalveil Fall (right) overlooking the Yosemite Valley.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Yosemite Valley/Wawona Tunnel Portal cover art, a Marvelous Mount Diablo woodcut engraving, or a nostalgic wintery scene of Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome as 12X18 inch wall art, mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Vintage Views: California

Yosemite_webOver the years, I’ve accumulated a number of vintage images of California in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). Rather than letting them sit around gathering dust (well, more than they have already), I began digitizing these assorted California ephemera and have since immortalized them on a more permanent medium.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Marvelous Mount Diablo woodcut engraving or a nostalgic wintery scene of Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome as 12X18 inch wall art, mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Yosemite in HD: The Star Spangled Banners of Heaven

If ever there was cinematic footage that left me feeling awestruck, humble, and infinitesimally insignificant at the same time, this is it. If you haven’t already had the pleasure of watching Sheldon Neill and Colin Delehanty’s Project Yosemite’s Yosemite in HD (Part I), prepare to be amazed.

ProjectYose

Although it is curious how much like spiders we resemble when pinned to a cliff face with carabiners and rope (time – 1:52) or how prolific are the numbers of satellites and planes challenging shooting stars for supremacy in the night-sky (time – 2:34) –  personally, the fireworks kick off when the sun drops and the stars pierce the night sky (time – 2:27), leaving me dizzy and reminding me of my precarious place on this swiftly tilting planet.

The buzz about Yosemite in HD Part II suggests a collaborative effort between Project Yosemite and The Muir Project, taking the cameras further afield to capture Yosemite in winter: more snow, more waterfalls, more remote. More awesome?

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Stebbins, A Life and Times

ROBERT STEBBINS’S MEMORIES

Written when he was 95 years old.
There is no logical nor chronological order to the memories.

Post 1

Salamanders That Walk With a cane

The Museum of vertebrate Zoology at U. C. Berkeley, an institution devoted primarely to the study of land-dwelling vertebrates (animals with a backbone), was ready to hire a full-time person in herpetology, the science of reptiles and amphibians. I was lucky to get the job!

I arrived at MVZ in 1945, feeling I had gotten the best herpetology job in the country (perhaps in the world!). I was 30 years old! By 1946 I was on my way to my first publication (it appeared in 1947). I was that dedicated to my emerging profession. The subject was a study of the Mount Lyell Salamander, Hydromantes platycephalus, an animal that had intrigued me for years. This attachment resulted from many family vacation trips to Yosemite and, especially, during my training there in 1940 to become a ranger naturalist in the National Park Service.

During that period, on a high Sierran trip, I came close to the place where the animal had been discovered but was unable, at the time, to search the area for salamanders. I had especially wanted to see the site where the species had first been found –the “type locality” (vicinity of Mt. Lyell). A mating pair had walked into a snap-trap set for rodents by MVZ researchers. The salamanders were found dead, pinned down together, under the lethal arm of the spring-driven trap. What a way to go!

However, on July 28, 1946, my long-sought goal was achieved. I saw my first living Mount Lyell Salamanders! Seven individuals from the top of Half Dome (seeming to me an unlikely place at the time) were on exhibit at the Yosemite Museum. They had been found under exfoliating rock shells on top of the dome. I was enthralled. But how did they get there over the smooth, sloping, granitic surfaces?

I began writing notes on coloration and behavior. Almost immediately I was struck by their movements. They moved about as if the tail was a cane. They curled the tail forward and placed the tip against the ground every time a hind leg was lifted. When crawling along a horizontal slope, the tail swung its support to the down-hill side. If the slope changed to the other side, the support shifted to the other side, and if the animal crawled directly up-slope, the tail tended to swing its support from side to side, more-or-less in sinc with the alternating leg movements. Unfortunately I failed to check down-hill effects.

The tip of the tail is blunt, which helps the animal deal with slippage and wear-and tear on rock surfaces.

The feet are also notable. They are wonderfully structured in ways that support locomotion on smooth rock surfaces, as well as in other less demanding environments. The figure shows the underside of a foot. Note the broad somewhat concave surface covered with furrows that increases the skin surface. The area is also covered with adhesive glands. When the animal is placed on a glass surface, even vertical, the adhesion afforded by the feet is great. They are able to climb a vertical glass surface! This explains why they can move about and ascend steep. smooth areas such as are present on Half Dome, and why they can travel so effectively on slick glacial polish, an indispensible requirement throughout much of their range. The tail action is ingrained. Even hatchlings use their tiny stubby tails as a “cane”!

Many years later, when I got around to recording their locomotion on motion picture film, I persuaded daughter Melinda to stage the animal for me. I asked for so many retakes (trying to get them just right) she finally got fed up and burst forth with an explosive “Dad, I’ve had it! I’m out of here” or some such expression. Don’t get me wrong, Lindy loves nature and her father.

Editor’s Note: With the exception of minor typographical and editorial corrections, all efforts have been taken to preserve Dr. Stebbins’ text as originally recorded.

For more information on this serial column featuring the life and times of Dr. Robert C. Stebbins, please visit this post.

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