Posts Tagged redwoods

Vintage Views: California

Bay-Bridge-1934-Standard-Oil-Bulletin_FINALSometimes majesty is found in the architecture of an environment, like the bridges that span the San Francisco Bay. Perhaps the most emblematic of those bridges are the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge. Both of these architectural feats were constructed in the 1930’s and, although the eastern span of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge has since been replaced after sections were damaged during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, the Golden Gate still stands intact today. The Golden Gate Bridge, between the City of San Francisco and Marin County, was begun on January 5, 1933 and opened on May 27, 1937. The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge), between the City of San Francisco and Oakland and anchored in the middle by Yerba Buena Island, was begun in 1933 and opened on November 12, 1936. Before the bridges were built, residents crossed the bay via an Air Ferry (of Air Ferries, Ltd.), amphibious air crafts that bridged the San Francisco Bay between terminals in San Francisco and Oakland. Coming in under 7 minutes from shore to shore, such flights were considered to be the most frequent and shortest air service in the world. The air ferries would eventually become obsolete with the construction of the Bay Bridge in 1936.

To celebrate these sister bridges, I have added several additional vintage images of California accumulated in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). One by one, I have been carefully digitizing these assorted California ephemera to immortalize them on a more permanent medium.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, and Yerba Buena Island cover art, as well as other vintage views of California, as 12X18 inch wall art mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

 

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Vintage Views: California

With the majestic Half Dome of Yosemite fame framed by the solid granite bedrock of the Wawona Tunnel – at that time (ca. 1932) still under construction – I am excited to share the newest iconic vintage images of California accumulated in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). One by one, I have been carefully digitizing these assorted California ephemera to immortalize them on a more permanent medium.

Inside this particular bulletin, dated 1932, the editor notes:

As you emerge from a hole in perpendicular granite cliffs, you are greeted by daylight, last in evidence nearly a mile behind you, and with it the whole Yosemite Valley appears to rush upon you. You catch your breath, awed and delighted – perhaps just a bit frightened – by its magnificence and the abruptness with which it has come. The glorious panorama now seems suddenly to have  become stationary, and you start traveling – as yet only by air routes and vision – to one after another of those stupendous creations of Nature that make this great gorge outstanding among the scenic wonders of the world.

This ‘hole,” as they called it, is the eastern portal of the Wawona Tunnel, which today conveys the Wawona Road 4,233 feet (1,290 m) through a mountain at the terminus of State Route 41 before discharging Yosemite National Park visitors at the Tunnel View scenic outlook. As they erupt into sunlight, there before them stands El Capitan (left), Half Dome (center), and Bridalveil Fall (right) overlooking the Yosemite Valley.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Yosemite Valley/Wawona Tunnel Portal cover art, a Marvelous Mount Diablo woodcut engraving, or a nostalgic wintery scene of Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome as 12X18 inch wall art, mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Vintage Views: California

Yosemite_webOver the years, I’ve accumulated a number of vintage images of California in association with the Vintage Views: Mount Diablo project I’ve undertaken with my wife (see Sarah Anne Photography). Rather than letting them sit around gathering dust (well, more than they have already), I began digitizing these assorted California ephemera and have since immortalized them on a more permanent medium.

Now, through the (bio)accumulation Etsy storefront, you can own your own Marvelous Mount Diablo woodcut engraving or a nostalgic wintery scene of Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome as 12X18 inch wall art, mounted on either Styrene suitable for matting and framing or infused directly into a sheet of aluminum metal to capture a sense of modern minimalism.

Metal Print
Metal prints are presented as a stand-alone image infused (printed) directly into a sheet of aluminum, providing a luminescent quality. The finished metal print includes a float-mount hanger affixed to the back of the image, floating the print ½ inch off the wall.
Price: $100

Styrene Mount Print
Styrene prints are mounted on white 2mm warp-resistant Styrene known for durability and strength. Styrene prints are ready to be matted and framed, or can be displayed on an easel.
Price: $45

To see all of the vintage wall art available to date, visit: https://www.etsy.com/shop/bioaccumulation

 

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Book Review: Rare Bird

Rare Bird: Pursuing the Mystery of the Marbled Murrelet, by Maria Mudd Ruth, Rodale Inc. (www.rodalestore.com), 2005, 298 pages, $23.95.

Up until the latter half of the 20th century, ornithologists were plagued by an oological mystery: Of the  700-plus birds known to nest in North America/Canada, the nest (and nesting behavior) of only one species – the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) – had eluded discovery. The marbled murrelet was first collected in 1776 in Alaska’s Prince William Sound by Dr. William Anderson, chief surgeon and naturalist to Captain James Cook’s HMS Resolution during their voyage in search of the Northwest Passage. At journey’s end, it took more than a decade before one of Anderson’s murrelets was formally designated in 1789 as the type specimen to describe this new species of auk. At the time, so little-to-nothing was known about this elusive bird that even famed naturalist John James Audubon fudged it by illustrating the marbled murrelet (known to him as a “slender-billed guillemot”) clinging to (and by association, nesting on) a seaside cliff like other typical murrelets based on the hearsay of fellow naturalists. But what naturalists didn’t know was that not only did the webbed feet of this species rarely touch terra firma, but finding the nest of this singular species would tantalize searchers for the next 185 years.

In 1923, while visiting Humboldt County, ornithologist Joseph Grinnell made the following observations in his journal (July 23):

“Each morning since I’ve been here, I’ve heard cries of some sort of birds high overhead in the fog. They could only be heard very early. At first I thought they might be hawks. Then I began to remember some of the same notes years ago, on Pescadero Creek in the Santa Cruz Mountains, and, I think, Sitka, Alaska – marbled murrelets! This morning, the fog was higher than usual and also the producers of the cries were out later than usual, up to 5:35 A.M. And I saw them! Birds with small chunky bodies, and rapidly, continuously beating small wings, like a small duck, very high, sometimes entering the fog… Mostly when I heard them, they were hidden in the fog… It would be easy to imagine them passing between the ocean to the west of us and the forested slopes of the mountain within half a mile of us. Truly a mystery!”

How could the nest of this seabird – a bird known affectionately today as a fog lark, dip chick, buzz bomb, little hell diver, and described at times as a flying potato or dark meteor – go undiscovered for so long? Given their cryptic nesting behaviors – crepuscular flights, inland sites, and proclivity for heights – simply put, no one knew where to look. Along the shore? In the woods? In trees or on the ground? Today, any good field guide will tell you that marbled murrelets nest along the Pacific Northwest up to 40 miles inland in old-growth forests on the thick, mossy limbs of mature redwoods, fir, spruce, cedars, and hemlocks at heights of 150 feet or more. Few guides, however, will explain how hard to come by these few facts proved to be.

Maria Mudd Ruth unravels this mystery in Rare Bird, an examination and exaltation of the evasive auk that taunted naturalists across one continent, two countries (United States and Canada), three centuries, and four states (Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California). Rare Bird plays out through Ruth’s viewpoint as a professed “accidental naturalist” naive to the world of ornithology or field biology. Through the marbled lenses of one enraptured by this enigmatic bird, Ruth brings to life the stories of the naturalists who toiled at great lengths, early hours, and towering heights to gather the raw data necessary to solve this mystery. Ruth moves effortlessly through time and space, crossing centuries and state lines to walk in the footsteps of intrepid explorers or in the shoes of exhausted researchers. From Anderson and Cook’s type collection in 1776 to tree trimmer Hoyt Foster’s fortuitous find at 148 feet atop a Douglas fir in 1974 to the wood mills, gill nets, oil spills, and raven kills in between, Ruth recounts the marbled murrelets’ rocky past with patience, compassion, and humor.

In short, Rare Bird is well done, a fitting tribute to the secretive marbled murrelet and the rare breed of biologists that have dedicated their lives to protecting it.

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